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  • Why ex-politicians have it so good? 11 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    AK 15.05.2009 22:07 one huge obstacle - most politically active Russians are in one way or another compromised themselves - it all revolves with history questions, attitudes towards May 9, Latvian occupation by Stalin's forces, mass repressions, etc. I will not trust guys like Mr.Usakovs, if he actively celebrates occupation of our land - May 9, or even is hesitant about recognizing Latvian occupation by the Soviets at all Do we need to wait for even younger generation of ethnic Russians in Latvia to be loyal to our country? ----- It's not about Russians compromising themselves - if you don't consider that to celebrate a victory over fascism is awful. It's about Latvian elite looking for explanations why Russians should not be trusted and this rotten elite should remain. Also, there is no politician in Latvia - Latvian or Russian - who would deny or glorify mass deportations. Besides, if a person has another view on history or future of Latvia, it doesn't mean he isn't loyal.

  • Why ex-politicians have it so good? 11 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Rita Našeniece 15.05.2009 20:49 sorry - last sentence has to be as "Thereby I can NOT share the agitation of author as regards this particular case." Once again - I agree that in a case of K., yes, it a local malady. And, yes, I have the stand that the state has to use any kind of chance to keep the expertise around.

  • Why ex-politicians have it so good? 11 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Rita Našeniece 15.05.2009 20:14 Actually Lieljuksis is not and has never been a politician. He is a pure water high class professional practitioner. He has not been dismissed on the basis of his incompetence, but in a large extent because the minister considers that the situation has too high demand towards decisive actions. This is more of the personality issues and it happens not only in Latvia. And I have a clear understanding of the intentions of the minister. It is incompatible to put in one basket Kalvitis who, I am afraid, hardly has any kind of the distinguished professional background apart of being a (failed) politician. Thereby I can share the agitation of author as regards this particular case. Apart of that - sure, I see the point and it is valid. Although not for the particular case mentioned above.

  • Why ex-politicians have it so good? 11 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Trauts 15.05.2009 14:27 First - it's safe place where to pass the winter in case of non-election. Second - they are also are generating money by donating it to party. Third - it's like criminal organization - if you will keep your mouth shut and obey our orders we will grant you nice place after your term. The question is do we really need these boards? It's been common practice that boards of state owned firms are from party and usually non-professionals and I think their contribution to firm is close to zero.

  • Why ex-politicians have it so good? 11 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

    Komentārs:Komentētājs

    Andris 15.05.2009 14:19 What about the third explanation: That even not so successful former politicians have above par relationships with men and women in power, and they posess other human capital as well. Just because of a pragmatic self-interest it is good to reward trusted people, and continue to have influence in crucial enterprises like Lattelecom. If reliable people in such sinecure posts are a must, and if the choice is between Mr. Kalvitis and "driver's son", "neighbor", "third cousin" of Mr.Slesers, then I prefer Mr.Kalvitis. Because he has at least minimum competence for such appointments, rather than mere loyalty. Perhaps in the USA the slogan "We will look after you, if you do well, if you screw up - you're on your own." does work. In Latvia we do not have too many people, who are fit for the top posts - our political nation is still young. So we must use whatever human resources we've got. Certainly, we need to broaden the power base - ruling coalition is not much trusted either by Latvians or Russians. About 20 years ago there were many Russian speakers holding posts of power in large state industries and elsewhere. Many of them are still here; and younger Russians could have excellent qualifications. Whether all people would like it or no - there is objective need to use their qualifications in various posts of leadership. But currently there is one huge obstacle - most politically active Russians are in one way or another compromised themselves - it all revolves with history questions, attitudes towards May 9, Latvian occupation by Stalin's forces, mass repressions, etc. I will not trust guys like Mr.Usakovs, if he actively celebrates occupation of our land - May 9, or even is hesitant about recognizing Latvian occupation by the Soviets at all Do we need to wait for even younger generation of ethnic Russians in Latvia to be loyal to our country? Until this happens, it is inevitable that people, who have mid-level manager skills (like Mr.Kalvitis, who would be nice director of a small food processing plant) are taking top level jobs. Just because they are not glorifying Soviet occupation and are trusted by their party.

  • Cutting budget expenditure: 'Mission Impossible'? 7 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Trauts 01.06.2009 11:59 http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/survey/so/2009/car052809... IMF chitchat

  • Cutting budget expenditure: 'Mission Impossible'? 7 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Juris Kaža 29.05.2009 21:12 In Latvia, there is a monopoly of expertise (?! or idiocy in many cases). But in the EU, where there are many states and freedom of movement, there is actually a choice of governance. Along with better employment opportunities (as soon as the other EU economies recover), Latvians will choose the better governed places to live and raise their families and still be 2 1/2 hours by Ryanair from their nominal homeland. This is what will bring stagnation and marginalization to Latvia as a country, thanks to the behavior of its political elite, up to when Valdis Dombrovskis took over as a "fall guy" for the previous governments.

  • Cutting budget expenditure: 'Mission Impossible'? 7 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    JB 28.05.2009 20:29 Well, it used to be two options - shoot first and only then ask questions or vice versa. I'm afraid now we have only the first option, and costs should be cut in the first place. With all adjustments and technical expertise we'll be able to deal afterwards.

  • Cutting budget expenditure: 'Mission Impossible'? 7 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Janis Juris 28.05.2009 10:52 Before talking about „mistakes”, the author should himself try to escape the naivete by carefully defining those allmighty „reformers” (or appointers of perfectly loyal reformers, if you wish). All ministers in the government is too wide a definition because a lot of political wrangling takes place there. Dombrovskis and Repse alone, on the oher hand, is too narrow a definiton because they simly don’t have enough power and resources to infiltrate and make decisions on all wages in the ministries. Seems that (contrary to the blog’s author) IMF has recognised this problem and is thus suggesting giving more power to Repse.

  • Cutting budget expenditure: 'Mission Impossible'? 7 Autors:Vjačeslavs Dombrovskis

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    Trauts 28.05.2009 10:18 I disagree. It's dependent on political will. Mr. Repše took decision to allow State Revenue Service work for 4 days. And this decision shows that about 20% of VID's officials are unnecessary. He could actually cut their numbers by 20% leaving salary untouched.